Joe Holliday

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Calling all agencies: New features added in Bing Places for Business

If you’re an agency managing client business listings on Bing Places for Business, we have some exciting news. We’ve added several new features to help you get your clients’ listings added and kept up to date.

First, register as an agency

We consider you an agency if you’ve been authorized or contracted by another business to manage their listings on Bing Places. In fact, registering yourself as an agency is the only way for you to manage someone else’s business listing on Bing Places.  Registering as an agency also allows you the convenience of adding and updating multiple businesses from a single account. You can also monitor the performance of the different businesses from a single dashboard.

To register as an agency, you will need to provide information about your agency and verify your agency’s email address. Go to http://www.bingplaces.com to get started.

Add multiple businesses

After registering as an agency, Bing Places allows you to add up to 10,000 businesses at once. Simply fill this template, complete and submit. The template includes comments and information about how to add the required information for each business.

After you upload your listings, they are reviewed for quality assurance purposes. Listings not conforming to the data quality guidelines will be suspended and not processed further. Listings that do pass the data quality review will then undergo client verification.

Get verification

After you submit your clients’ business listing to Bing Places, your client must verify the listing, which helps us ensure that you are authorized to manage their information. During client verification, a verification PIN is sent by postcard to each of your clients. Either you or your client then must enter that PIN on Bing Places to complete verification. 

Businesses are often listed and verified individually. However, it is also possible to register a “chain” business. A chain business has multiple locations, franchises, properties, or store fronts spread across a geographical region. Examples include retail stores, hotels and fast food restaurants. The advantage of registering a business as a chain is that you do not have verify each location of the chain individually. You instead must provide a signed authorization from your client (chain). We will verify the authorization and then set up your agency account to manage the chain locations.

Your agency dashboard

Possibly one of the most useful new features for agencies is the agency dashboard.

 bing places for business agency dashboard

On the dashboard, you can add new businesses listings and check on the listings you’ve already submitted.

The dashboard provides a summary of all the listings you’ve added to date. No more wondering if your listings have been processed! The summary also includes a count of listings that have problems that need to be corrected. You can download these listings along with the error information for each one. You can then quickly get them fixed and resubmitted.

Finally, the dashboard also provides detailed information for each individual listing, including status and impression information. Each item includes links allowing you to see the actual listing on Bing and Bing Maps.

It’s always nice to share

As an agency, you can use a single account to manage all of your listings. You can also share access to individual listings with each of your clients. Sharing access allows the client to view and work with their listing from their own account on Bing Places.

Give it a try

If you’re an agency helping clients get the business on Bing, now’s the time. Bing Places for Business’ new agency tools make it easier than ever.

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Understanding the Ad Extension Reports in Bing Ads

Here’s the latest in the Bing Ads Reporting Series. This one is very closely related to the first article in the group: Understanding the call details report.  If you haven’t had a chance to read that one, consider taking a look.

Also, I’d really love to get your suggestions on what other reports you’d like to hear about. Please feel free to give me some ideas in the comment section below!

Now, let’s get started:

Report names:

Ad extension by ad

Ad extension by keyword

Questions they answer:

How many impressions and clicks are each of my ad extensions getting?

What combination of ad extensions are displaying and how many clicks did each extension receive?

Do I get more clicks on an ad with a particular type of extension?

 

The report data

The Ad Extension reports provide impression and click data per ad extension type or per click type.

Here's an example of some of the data provided in these reports (grouped by extension type), along with a short explanation of what the data means:

Report data

 

Tells you that...

Ad extension Type

Click Type

Impressions

Clicks

   

Metered call

Ad title

10

4

 

Your metered call extension (which is your call extension using a forwarding number) was shown with the ad title 10 times. You also can see that the ad title was clicked four times.

Metered call

Click to direction

5

2

 

Your metered call extension was shown along with a map five times. The map was clicked two times.

Metered call

Phone call

10

2

 

Your metered call extension was shown with the forwarding number 10 times. (Which makes sense, given these two items are the same thing.) The phone number was clicked two times.

Location extension

Ad Title

7

4

 

Your location extension was displayed seven times with the ad title. The ad title was clicked four times.

Location extension

Click to direction

5

3

 

Your location extension was displayed with a map five times. The map was clicked three times.

Location extension

Phone call

5

2

 

Your location extension was displayed with a call forwarding number five times. The phone number was clicked twice.

 

Using the data

First, make sure you understand what each field means and the data that is included in each of the reported values. Take a look at the report field glossary for help with some of the more complicated values.

The data in the example gives you some valuable information to act on. For simplicity, let's assume your overall impressions for each type of ad extension matches the impressions for the ad title. In other words, your overall impressions for your metered call extension is 10 and your overall impressions for your location extension is seven. (Note that in reality, if the option to display "Just the phone number" was chosen, total impressions could be higher than the ad title impressions.)

Given this assumption, if the above information is for a single ad, you can see that the metered call extension (your forwarding number) appears to give your ad some lift in total impressions (ten vs. seven). On the other hand, your ad with the location extension got four clicks out of a total of seven impressions for a click through rate (CTR) of 57% (beating the 40% CTR of the call extension). The ad with the location extension and a map got even better CTR results.

Given this short example, depending on your campaign goals (for example awareness and impressions vs. CTR), you might consider focusing on one or the other type of extension. If your looking for awareness, adding a call extension seems to work. A location extension seems to improve CTR.

(Of course these numbers are exaggerated for sake of illustration. CTRs of 57% and 40% are not typical.)

NOTE: The information contained in this blog post is intended for agencies and advertisers that are either self-managed or supported by Microsoft.  If you are an agency or advertiser managed by Yahoo, the details herein may not be applicable, and you are encouraged to contact your Account Representative for more information.

Questions? Comments? Feel free to leave a comment below or ping us on Twitter.

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Bing Ads Reporting Series: Understanding the Product Ad Reports

Of the three blogs so far in this reporting series, this will be the easiest to explain and understand. Why? Because many of you are already familiar with the product ad reports and know how to use them. It’s true! Read on and I’ll explain....

Overview

These two product ad reports are just like the other performance reports you already know and love. If you’re familiar with keyword performance reports, ad performance reports, campaign performance reports, or any of the many other performance reports in Bing Ads, you already know how to use these two new reports recently introduced with Product Ads.

These two reports provide performance data for your Product Ads at two different levels: For your Product Targets and your Product Offers. Both reports have the most common performance data selected by default, including:

  • Impressions
  • Clicks
  • CTR (%)
  • Average CPC
  • Spend

This data is all grouped by either Product Target or Product Offer.

For example, a couple rows in your Product Target report might look like:

Product Target

Impressions

Clicks

CTR (%)

Avg. CPC

Running Shoes

5000

50

1%

1.25

Dress Shoes

800

4

0.5%

.40

The Product Offer report is very similar.  For example:

Product Offer ID

Impressions

Clicks

CTR (%)

Avg. CPC

XYZ1

5000

50

1%

1.25

XYZ2

5000

50

1%

1.25

XYZ3

5000

50

1%

1.25

XYZ4

5000

5

0.1%

1.25

(One other field that aggregators will see on the Product Offer report is the seller name.  The seller name helps aggregators identify which of their catalogs the data in each row applies to.)

Using the Data

Use these reports just like any other performance report: Identify Product Targets or Product Offers that are either performing well or underperforming, then take the appropriate action.

For example, from the first table, you can see that your Dress Shoes Product Target has a very low number of impressions and its CTR is only 0.5%. So first, you might want to bump up those impressions:

  • Maybe a boost in your bid will help
  • Consider how you might improve your catalog:  For example,  ensure that you’re completing as many of the optional fields as possible and that the data describes your offers in as much detail as possible

More impressions might also boost your CTR. You could further work to improve your CTR by improving your ad copy. In the case of product ads, that means improving your promotional text .  (Be aware that promotional text does not yet appear for all ads, but don’t worry it’s coming soon.) 

You can do the same type of analysis with the Product Offer report. This report offers similar information, just at a more granular level, listing the data by individual Product Offers. Looking at the second table, you can see that offer XYZ4 needs some help. One way you can try to optimize here is by creating a more granular product target that contains XYZ4. This will help more closely relate search terms with the actual products included in the target and as a result, ideally bring you more clicks per impression. Increasing your bid on this new target could help even more.

Summary

Monitor and optimize your Product Ad campaigns using these reports just as you would use the other performance reports to monitor and optimize your text ads. Identify strong performing Product Targets and Offers and leverage their strengths. Likewise, identify poorly performing items and make adjustments to get those fixed.

A quick thanks to Kunaal Pandya from our Product Ads team for helping me with the information provided here. As always, I’m looking forward to your feedback and your requests for other reports you want covered.

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Bing Ads Reporting Series: Understanding the Share of Voice Report in Bing Ads

This is the second article in a regular series about using the various reports and graphs in Bing Ads. These articles quickly summarize the data provided by a particular Bing Ads report and give you ideas on how to use that data.

My first article received a great response, including a request for a blog about the Share of Voice (SOV) report. I’m very happy to oblige! You'll find the Share of Voice (SOV) report located in "Performance Reports" within Bing Ads, it'll help you answer questions around whether there are more impressions for your keywords and if so, how you can capture them.

Using the Data

The SOV report tells you what percentage of impressions for the total marketplace you are not receiving and, just as importantly, why you’re losing out.

For example, let’s say for the keyword flowers, the Yahoo Bing Network served 10,000 impressions. You received 100 of those impressions, or 1%. The SOV report would tell you that you lost 99% of the possible impressions. You have a lot of opportunity for additional market share!

On the other hand, let’s instead say your received 5,000 impressions. That means your ads were displayed 50% of the time anyone searched for flowers. That’s a good solid number and not something you’d necessarily need to act upon.

(NOTE: Your impression share is calculated based on total “eligible” market impressions. That is, it takes into account certain limitations such as targeting. So in the above example, if you had targeted “Washington,” those 10,000 impressions were all impressions in Washington. Impressions that don’t meet your targeting criteria are filtered out prior to calculating your SOV.)

In addition to telling you the percentage of impressions you lost, the SOV report also tells you why. Maybe your bid for that keyword is too low, or maybe you’re losing impressions because of a low budget that is being depleted too quickly. This information is provided by the following fields in the SOV report:

  • Impression share lost to budget (%)
  • Impression share lost to rank (%)
  • Impression share lost to landing page relevance (%)
  • Impression share lost to keyword relevance (%)
  • Impression share lost to bid (%)

These numbers combined with the share that you actually are receiving will add up to 100%. In other words:

 
   
image      
 
 

Use this information to determine if:

1. For any given keyword, there is room for you to gain additional share, and

2. If there is, where you can focus your efforts in order to get that additional share.

Given the specific categories above, it’s often straightforward as to the action that needs to be taken. But at the risk of pointing out what is probably very obvious, here are some examples of what you can do to address each of the categories:

Problem

Example action

  Losing share due to budget

  Increase your budget.

  Losing share due to rank

  Increase your bid and improve your quality score. You can find more ideas here.

  Losing share due to landing page relevance

  Improve your landing page and ad relevance. Here are some ideas.

  Losing share due to keyword relevance

  Remove underperforming keywords and use negative keywords. This article has some other ideas.

  Losing share due to bid

  Increase your bid.

Our example – continued

Remember our first flowers example above, where we are only receiving 1% of the impressions. If that were the case, maybe our SOV report looks like this:

  • Impression share lost to budget (%): 5%
  • Impression share lost to rank (%): 25%
  • Impression share lost to landing page relevance (%): 10%
  • Impression share lost to keyword relevance (%): 10%
  • Impression share lost to bid (%): 49%

Wow! Looks like we really need to increase our bid for the keyword flowers. Not only will that help with the last item, it will also very likely help with the second item (lost to rank) as well. Further, it doesn’t appear we are running out of budget, so increasing our bid seems like a very likely first step.

Summary

There is no magic number or firm baseline as to how much market share is enough. That depends on a variety of factors, including the product or service you’re advertising, the number of competitors advertising the same thing, and the size of your business. So rather than focusing on a specific baseline number, look at your campaign as a whole instead, comparing your keywords to one another. Identify keywords whose market share is significantly lower than the others and work to improve those.

While it’s possible for a small local business that’s advertising a local product or service to get 100% of the impression share, that does not necessarily have to be your goal. I’d suggest that you take a realistic look at your competition and then set your goals accordingly. Although 100% impression share might not be feasible, don’t lose out on your fair share either!

Once again, I look forward to your comments on this article, as well as suggestions for future articles about your favorite (or most mysterious) reports.

Happy advertising! And please keep your requests coming via adding your comments below.

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Bing Ads Reporting Series: Understanding the Call Details Report

Bing Ads provides a wealth of data and insights about your campaigns' performance. Given the wide variety of information available, it can sometimes be difficult to know which report or which graph you should use to get the answers you need. 

Over the next few months, I will be blogging about various reports and graphs in Bing Ads in the hopes that summarizing the data provided in these reports might help answer some of the questions you may have about how successful your campaigns are. These articles will also be available in our Bing Ads help documentation. 

Before I get started with diving into providing clarity on the Call Details report, a quick plea for your help: in order for these blog posts to provide the most value, I need to hear from you!  What reports do you have questions about? Or, better yet, which reports to you find most helpful or that you like to use in your presentations to others on how your campaigns are doing? I’m looking for feedback on where best to focus these blog posts, so please provide your ideas in the comments below.

With that, let’s start out with a very simple report that can be explained in just a few paragraphs: the Call details report. 

Report name: Call details
Relevant to: Advertisers using Call Extensions

Questions it answers:

Which campaigns are driving the most phone calls?

Are these "high-quality" calls?

 

Overview

The Call details report provides you detailed information about the performance of your Call Extension forwarding number. The data includes information about:

  • The time and date the call was made
  • The length of the call
  • When possible, the associated campaign (If a call was made to a forwarding number without clicking on the ad (for example, the customer jotted the number down and manually called it later), it might not be possible to associate a specific campaign with that call.  If that is the case, the campaign columns on the report will be blank.)

Data for all calls made using the forwarding number can be included on this report. This means that the report will include data about calls made via a click on your ad, or even calls from a customer who saw the phone number in your ad and then called it manually at a later time.  However, you should also be aware that the Call details report does not include data about calls made to any other phone numbers that might be shown in your ad, such as a phone number included in your Location Extensions or a non-metered Call Extension number.

Using the Data

By using the information in the Call details report, you can evaluate the effectiveness of the Call Extensions in your online campaigns.  You will be able to identify particular campaigns that are getting more calls than others via those Call Extensions, or, on the other hand you will also be able to note campaigns that are not generating calls. In the later case, consider what might be causing the issue: For example, use other reports to determine if  you are lacking impressions or if the impressions are just not attracting attention.

You’ll also have insight into calls that are notably longer or shorter than others. Depending on your business, consider if longer calls might mean conversions (and therefore imply your ads are attracting the appropriate customers), while perhaps shorter calls might indicate your ads are targeting and attracting the wrong folks.

Summary

If you’re using Call Extensions, the Call details report is worth your time investigating. The insight it provides can help you optimize the use of those extensions, leveraging strong performers, and fixing those that aren’t working.

As promised, short and sweet. I’m looking forward to hearing from you for ideas on other reports you’d like me to cover.

Until then, Happy Advertising!

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New to Bing Ads? This 2-Minute Video Gets You Started

I’ll admit it: I’m horrible at directions. I have to drive someplace a dozen times or more using my car’s navigation system before I dare try to get there on my own. Even then I find myself a bit nervous without Edna (that’s my GPS - we’re on a first name basis) sternly telling me to “Turn left here.”

As someone who never goes anywhere without a map, I find the latest video from our Bing Ads Help team very appealing. The video, A Quick Tour of Bing Ads, takes you on a swift trip through Bing Ads. It’s not meant for you PPC veterans who can create campaigns in your sleep, but if you are new to Bing Ads and want to find your way around, this is a valuable use of two minutes.

After watching the video you will know where to get started creating ads, how to quickly navigate between the essential parts of your campaign, where you can find alerts and suggestions, and much more.

This video won’t show you the details of creating and managing a campaign; we have other videos for that. But to get oriented and become efficient at quickly finding your way around Bing Ads, this is the place to start.

 

Bing Ads Quick Tour
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